Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Europe's New Northern Cyprus?

Non-recognition of Crimea's status as part of Russia must be more than just words

If it looks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it's a duck. Western leaders have all been quick to proclaim non-recognition of Russia's annexation of Crimea. Yet just days after what could only very charitably be called a referendum on Crimea joining Russia (including a creditable 123% vote in favour in Simferopol and minus any option to remain in the country it has existed in for the past two decades) it seems the world is grudgingly accepting the inevitable, having offered only meagre sanctions, and apparently relieved that Russia appears to have settled for 'only Crimea'. If they're not careful their 'no business as usual' mantra will soon sound as tired and hollow as their 'red lines'.

In truth, Russia would probably have annexed it or set up a breakaway state there along with Transnistria, South Ossetia and Abkhazia in the early '90s had it not massively underestimated Ukraine's divergent political direction from that of Russia. It's difficult to see whether this will fulfil Putin's aim of bringing Ukraine as a whole 'back into the fold'; the two countries now have different sides of a historical grievance to rally around.


In the here and now, clearly the most immediate pressing concern is Ukraine's isolated military units in the peninsula. Whilst both their fortitude and restraint are commendable, there is no international military backing for them whatsoever, and if more of their lives are to be spared, it seems inevitable they will have to withdraw.

Then we must consider the issue of status. There is little prospect of a treaty or formal agreement here. Making any such agreement with Russia would be a catch 22, as making any new agreement would involve formally tearing up a previous one (the 1994 Budapest Memorandum). In so doing, what possible validity could a new agreement have if it could be torn up so easily? Therefore non-recognition seems the only way forward.

For this non-recognition to make any sense however we need to figure out what non-recognition will mean in practice. Non-recognition is absolutely right, but the problem is that if Crimea is treated as a part of the Russian Federation it basically will be.  So the wherewithal of non-recognition and how it could work needs to be figured out quite quickly. As an example, Northern Cyprus is never shown on basic maps as anything other than part of the Republic of Cyprus, and this has never lapsed in 40 years. There was for a long time even a trade ban on the export of Northern Cyprus products, abolished only in 2003. Here Greece was the force to push this forward. Ukraine will be in a stronger position to push once the DCFTA with the EU is up and running.

As regards measures on the ground, non-recognition might involve cutting transport links. It seems to me that it would be adding insult to injury to allow Russian Railways to continue to operate trains to Crimea, merely 'transiting' Ukraine proper, and this is an obvious means of sanctioning the tourism industry there. There is a case for cutting rail links between Crimea and mainland Ukraine altogether in fact. In the case of Northern Cyprus, only flights from Turkey can fly into the territory. The same blockade might be enacted by the international community here. Alternative connections could be built up via, for example, Odessa.

Energy and water are also key issues. Many have pointed out that, with the ability to cut off the peninsula's water and electricity, Kiev has a potential card to play. If the prospect of a gas cut off rears its head once more, this is obviously an option. There will have to be some restraint however. A closure of the border similar to the closure the Spanish inflicted on Gibraltar for many years would only hurt families on both sides.

There should be vigorous public campaigns against organisations endorsing the change. For example, early rumours that National Geographic is to change its map may be the start of a capitulation that must be resisted through any means available. Disregarding all other arguments, it can simply be pointed out that no major power has recognised the occupation and that the case is yet to go before the International Court of Justice.


Sport is also a factor. UEFA could play a useful role in non-recognition of Crimea's Russian status. Tavriya Simferopol and FK Sevastopol currently play in the Ukrainian Premier League and should continue to do so, and UEFA has the power to make such decisions. In in albeit more innocuous example, France's Evian TG FC were refused permission to play home games across the Swiss border in Geneva as it was in another state. On this basis UEFA should refuse to allow any teams from Crimea to participate in the Russian league structure, and threaten trouble if they do, with Russia's participation in the 2014 and hosting of the 2018 tournament potentially at risk. FIFA has always taken a hard line on political interference in the running of football (at least with African countries) so it should be difficult for Russia to force UEFA's or FIFA's hand. 

Finally, there is the question of the endgame. Even the most optimistic would be hard pressed to think that Crimea will ever truly return to Ukrainian rule. Whilst before the Russian intervention it seems there wasn't a majority in favour of Russian rule, it will be equally difficult several years down the line to expect a majority to be in favour of Ukrainian rule. But it is reasonable to hope for a more legitimate settlement in Crimea in future. Little will be possible without democracy, and with Putin's situation apparently strengthened, there is little hope for the time being, but this illustrates the need for non-recognition to be maintained, for decades if need be, as with Northern Cyprus.

What Crimeans need to realise is that the dismantling of the Ukrainian letters on the front of the Verkhovna Rada of Crimea represents, in effect, the dismantling of autonomy. The Russian Federation is a federation in name only, and Putin has progressively abolished autonomy across the country during his rule. A once ambitious plan for Kaliningrad, for example, to be a 'Baltic Republic' using both the rouble and the Euro and forming a gateway to the EU was, with Putin's accession to power, promptly shelved. Look at Kaliningrad now-a neglected backwater from which Russians flock across the border to shop at cheaper Polish supermarkets. Crimea is also, for now, doomed to become such a backwater, and they will see that last week's fake foray into democracy bears little relation to the future, where elections will offer no genuine choice and factual information, from a media which has moved from bias to full on North Korea style propaganda, will be scarce.

In a post-Putin scenario however, the issue will almost certainly be revisited. It could be argued that, in a democratised Russia, if given true autonomy, with full language rights for minorities, there would be little reason to complain about Russian rule. If Tatar, for example, appeared on bilingual street signs alongside Russian, few could complain. Another proposal might be independence, and a parallel might be drawn with Slovakia, where a 10% Hungarian minority, despite many tensions, ensures that the rights of minorities are addressed. An independent Crimea would have a 15% Tatar minority and a significant Ukrainian population, so in a democratic scenario, the communities would each have to be taken seriously. If by then however the non-recognition policy has lapsed, that opportunity will be lost.

Remember that after three decades of occupation, the Turkish population of Northern Cyprus in 2004 actually voted in favour of reunion with the south. Many of them have taken Republic of Cyprus citizenship (not surprisingly as this is also EU citizenship). Ukraine should consider changing the law to allow dual citizenship for all those in Crimea who wish to remain Ukrainian (it would also be in the wider interests of a country which has consistently lost citizens since 1991). A lot depends on the capacity of Ukrainians to build a successful country that will weaken the will of Crimeans to keep it in Putin's prison. If the EU follows through and grants visa free travel to Ukrainians, as it will do for Moldovans this May, the idea of having a 'Russkiy pasport' already begins to lose its appeal. For Crimea, it might be the beginning of a long road back.

Monday, March 03, 2014

Identity stretching in Eastern Ukraine

So, if the Russian flag kindly raised on Kharkiv's city hall by a young man from Moscow means anything, Eastern Ukrainians are all now 'Russians', and those bad people in Kiev are 'Ukrainians'. Hang on. A 'pro-Russian' government has only just been ousted, one member of which, the hated education minister Tabachnyk, had a strong view on 'Ukrainians'. For him, the easterners are the real 'Ukrainians', whilst the Western Ukrainians are not Ukrainians at all, but 'Galicians'.

One wonders what Eastern Ukrainians really think of this sudden makeover of their identities. Even the oligarchs have made great play of Eastern Ukrainians being 'Ukrainians'. Two of Ukraine's group games at Euro 2012 were staged in Donetsk, most likely at the behest of the Donbas Arena's owner, Rinat Akhmetov. Clearly people in the east feel closer to Russia than other Ukrainians, but that's still some way off being Russian. How will they adjust to their sudden new identities? Most likely, being habitually ruled by fear, they continue to superficially go about their daily lives and conform to prescribed behaviour from whoever seems to be in charge.

How to hurt Putin

Sign the Association Agreement

The best thing the EU could do is get Acting President Turchynov on a plane to Brussels as soon as possible and sign the Association Agreement. The EU has shown itself over the past 3 months to be an utterly incompetent foreign policy actor. The extra powers won at Lisbon look ill-deserved, the posts of Foreign Policy Representative and EU President worthy of abolition at the next treaty change. However, the EU still has a massive tool at its disposal. The whole point of the Kremlin’s crusade all along has been to prevent the signing of the AA and to ensure Ukraine was on the path to the Eurasian Union, so signing the agreement would be a blow to Putin in no uncertain terms. It might even stabilise the situation across Ukraine and give opponents of the occupiers in Crimea a concrete reason to hang on to their Ukrainian passports. The Kremlin delights in knowing the west will never act so quickly and decisively. Oh that we could.

Close the Bosphorous to Russian shipping

Turkey has a role to play here, and a right to do so on a number of counts. Firstly, the Crimean Tatars, whose future inside a Russia with an awful minority rights record looks potentially appalling, are the Turks’ ethnic kin (as place names such as Kazantip or Bağçasaray bear clear testament to), so arguably Turkey has a moral obligation here, and the Crimean Tatar diaspora in Turkey itself would support this. Turkey's media is already claiming, rather in the way that Spain does with Gibraltar, that if Crimea breaks away, it should legally revert to Turkish rule. Although that's practically impossible, it does help to legtimise Turkish involvement. Secondly, Putin’s support for Assad has had direct consequences for Turkey, bringing with it massive refugee problems. Thirdly, Russia’s asserting itself on the Black Sea has major implications for the Black Sea security situation. Turkey should close off the Bosphorous to Russian shipping and insist on a place at the table if there is mediation. Or at the very least, Russian ships passing through the straits (there have been two in recent days) ought to be 'escorted' by their Turkish counterparts. One of two warships dispatched to the fringe of the region would also concentrate minds in Moscow. Erdoğan would probably appreciate a distraction from domestic issues, including a corruption probe. They might not have a spotless record themselves on human rights, but at the moment Ukraine should take all the help it can get.


Sanctions

An obvious one, but it took a very long time indeed and many deaths before it really looked like becoming a reality for the orchestrators of the violent crackdown in Kiev. It has been claimed however, by Mikhail Saakashvili for example, that it was the crystalising of the threat of sanctions that finally lead to the collapse of Yanukovych's house of cards. Sanctions against Russian officials might also try the patience of many of Putin's backers. There is also the potential for broader economic sanctions, and with the Russian economy now on the ropes, their impact might be felt quickly.

Saturday, March 01, 2014

Україна потребує парламентську систему

Нова політична система України повинна бути найрадикальнішою з усіх на пострадянському просторі.

Варшава, 26 лютого 2014

Це не вперше коли Українці прагнуть змін. Лише девять років тому, здавалося, що країна обрала напрямок змін і сподівання при цьому були високі. Цього разу існують застереження та памятка про те, що вартість теперішніх змін є набагато вищою. Холодний прийом звільненої Тимошенко є найбільш ясним свідченням щирого бажання українського народу навести лад у хаті”. Українці принаймні знають до чого вони прагнуть. Але не варто забувати і про те, що травневі вибори вже не за горами і хтось має виконувати роль капітана корабля, незважаючи на власну недосконалість. Україна сьогодні – це чистий аркуш паперу і тепер вона не повинна прагнути побудувати чиюсь утопію. На сьогоднішній день, активність та компроміс являються основними ключами від виживання країни та її майбутнього добробуту.


Одне з основних завдань на сьогодні полягає у формуванні культури конституціоналізму. Теперішня влада зазнала легітимної кризи.  Капітуляція попередніх влад та їх голосування в переважній кількості щодо прийняття нових законів призвело до неочікуваного зворотного ефекту феномена "тушек" 2010 року. Відносини між депутатами та їх виборчими мандатами є нестабільні, беручи до уваги, що парламентські вибори 2012 року були проведені із недотриманням мінімальних демократичних стандартів. Якщо б міжнародна неурядова організація Freedom House дала Україні оцінку ступеня демократичних свобод, на сьогоднішній день, країна не оцінювалася би як вільна. Очевидно, що всі ці майбутні зміни залежать від виборів в травні цього року.

І найпершим завданням має бути розуміння того, що політика більше не може бути пов’язана із позицією особистості у ній. Пострадянський рефлекс наслідування сильного духом лідера має катастрофічний вплив на всі регіони країни. Прийшов час кинути виклик Євразійському міфу, який наголошує на те, що ми всі різні. Цей міф вже коштував багатьом людям у Євразії їх життя і свобод.

Україна повинна прийняти абсолютну парламентську систему правління, якою користується більшість країн Європи. Президент повинен бути залишений тільки із правом на вето та з правом на призначення нових виборів. Сильний прем'єр-міністр може перейняти "президентський стиль" ведення політики, як наприклад, Маргарет Тетчер або Тоні Блер, але зверніть увагу на передачу влади від  Тетчер у 1990 році. Знана у світі як "залізна леді", в той час коли вона втратила підтримку своєї партії, її політична  сила зникла за лічені години. Існує і об’єктивне підтвердження тому, що парламентські системи, які при необхідності враховують більш широкий спектр зацікавлених сторін, мають кращі показники досягнення реформ.

Система функціонування партій також потребує реформи. Україна повинна викрити “віртуальні партії”, які функціонують виключно навколо особистостей і їх бізнес-інтересів і носять певний  ідеологічний характер. Значний відсоток виборчих голосів  на останніх виборах отримали  ліві радикали («Комуністична партія України»)  радикали-націоналісти  («Свобода») ,що нажаль підтверджує факт, що принаймні чверть українських виборців вирішили голосувати віддаючи перевагу ідеологічними переконаннями. Ми повинні дати виборцям із помірно центристських  та правоцентристських  політичних партій право на голос також. Маємо працювати і з тими представниками політичних угрупувань, переконання яких, можливо, не повністю узгоджується із нашими переконаннями, адже партія представляє собою коаліцію з різнобічними інтересами.

Мати парламентську систему правління також означає підпорядкування правилам цієї системи. Після травневих виборів 2014 не має проявитися жодної толерантності щодо  «гри на фортепіано на Майдані», насильств в тюрмах, блокування трибуни спікера, або будь-яких інших подібних заходів. Можливо, Верховна Рада має відігравати роль рефері  по відношенню до  депутат атів, що порушили протокол. В іншому випадку, спокуса зрізати кути буде дуже сильною, і ми досить ясно бачимо цей результат зараз.
Для того щоб зберегти єдність України, ми маємо замислитися над тим як задіяти усіх і кожного у політичному процесі. Ось де виникає дилема. Сьогодні є вкрай необхідно створити нові основні політичні норми на Україні і це безпосередньо стосується прийняття нової Конституції України. Міністр закордонних справ Росії закликає до прийняття нової Конституції лише після виборів, яка має бути ухвалена на референдумі. Ця думка представляє собою логічне втілення, але є проблема. Якщо ми споглянемо на те, яким чином Янукович вніс дестабілізацію в конституційні структури України в 2010 році, вагомий аргумент підпадає на підтримку нових законів у першу чергу, але беззаперечно для легітимності таких дій, вся країна має бути задіяна.

І олігархи відіграють тут свою роль . Вони можуть продовжувати грати активну і впливову роль, так само, як,наприклад, республіканці роблять в Америці. Тим не менш, беручи до уваги цілеспрямованість країни вони повинні визнати, що їх найвпливовіший час вже проминув. Це означає, що ЄС має змогу зіграти ключову роль. Михайло Саакашвілі нещодавно говорив про те, як непередбачувана загроза санкцій стала переломним моментом для багатьох прихильників Януковича. І якщо загроза санкцій від ЕС стосувалася економічних та політичних зловживань в більш поширених випадках до яких часто прибігають олігархи, то в такий спосіб було б можливим зменшити надмірні повноваження бізнес еліт України . Значно ускладнює цю ситуацію роль олігархів, які попри всі негаразди та невдачі попередньої влади  не зупинили її підтримку, навіть у той час коли ситуація різко погіршилася. Важко оцінити виняткову впливовість олігархів в політичному житті країни, в подальшому може виявитися і те, що їх впливовість стане неминучою.

Для того, щоб зауважити на всі відмінності регіонів України необхідно багато часу. На сьогодні Україні не вистачає політичної зрілості для федералізму, що може спровокувати зовнішнє втручання у вразливі для країни регіони, як ситуація в Криму нам про це і засвідчила. Проте в питаннях, що стосуються мовних прав, таке втручання може нести логічний характер, що  дозволить  деяку свободу на місцевому рівні. Наприклад у Франції, мови меншин можна побачити на дорожніх знаках,вони фінансуються за допомогою місцевих муніципалітетів, але національна мова має також бути відображена на дорожніх знаках (і місцевий муніципалітет платить і за це). Це насправді може стати чудовою рисою розвитку місцевої демократії. Відповідальність за святкування історичних подій, будь то 9 травня, або ж день українського повстанського руху, повинні також здійснюватися на місцевому рівні, адже на національному рівні ці питання виявилися занадто розбіжними. Такі емоційні питання більше не повинні бути пропагандистськими запалами або інструменти для політиків впливу в країні.

Деякі з найвагоміших питань все ще залишаються без відповідей. Найбільш важливою є загроза, що стосується робочих місць у Східній Україні, яка відтепер становить торгову блокаду Путіна. Яким чином ми можемо пояснити людям, що це не привід, щоб підтримувати вступ України до Митного союзу, або ж протистояння проти демократії? Швидше, факт того, що Путін використовує їх робочі місця як політичний інструмент, має стати чинником загального обурення, і населення Східної України має бути більш невдоволеним щодо цього, ніж будь-хто. Передбачуване зростання цін на газ також викликає занепокоєння, хоча заздалегідь передбачуваний план щодо зворотного потоку газу зі Словаччини майже не має перешкод.

У відносинах з Росією довіра буде зменшуватися з кожним роком і Україна має захистити себе. В найближчому часі всі переговори на вищому рівні між Україною і Росією мають здійснюватися на терені третьої країни-посередника,а також дотримуватися дипломатичних норм. Ми не маємо допустити перенесення дипломатичних відносин у площину таємних зустрічей та залякувань, як це можна прослідити на прикладі відносин між Януковичем та Путіним. Необхідно докласти багато зусиль для того,щоб відносини між Україною та Росією стали прозорими.

Ступінь саботажу зі сторони Росії щодо управління внутрішніми справами України протягом останніх кількох років очевидне. Більше дискусій мають проводитися серед публічного загалу, а також  піддаватися детальній критиці.

Україна повинна продовжувати наполегливо працювати, що також підтверджує і те, що насправді, багато з українських установ вже і роблять. У сфері оборони, що рідко згадується, навіть за часи президентства Януковича, країна концентрувала свої сили на співпраці з НАТО в багатьох областях. На сьогоднішній день імовірність переходу до професійної армії є великою. Політика Європейської інтеграції після трьох місяців перерви може бути поновлена і за наявності політичної волі ‘з верхівок’ технічна частина операції має досягти найкращих результатів.

Зважаючи на всі події в новій історії України,  українці тепер розуміють, що майбутнє залежить від них. ЄС має бути прийнято в якості гаранта європейського майбутнього України, але українці не може повністю покладатися на це об’єднання держав. Слідуючи логіці коментарів Саакашвілі, якби ЄС діяли раніше в умовах кризи, 100 українців залишилося б в живих сьогодні.
Джонатан Хiбберд раніше був відвідуючим професором програми європейських досліджень в Києво-Могилянській академії і проживав в Україні протягом шести років. Зараз живе у Варшаві, але продовжує співпрацювати з науково-дослідницьким інститутом зовнішньої політики Дипломатичної академії України. Отримав ступінь Магістра  Університета Сассекса у Великобританії.  Спеціалізується на українських відносин з ЄС і НАТО.

Україна потребує парламентську систему

Нова політична система України повинна бути найрадикальнішою з усіх на пострадянському просторі.

Варшава, 26 лютого 2014

Це не вперше коли Українці прагнуть змін. Лише девять років тому, здавалося, що країна обрала напрямок змін і сподівання при цьому були високі. Цього разу існують застереження та памятка про те, що вартість теперішніх змін є набагато вищою. Холодний прийом звільненої Тимошенко є найбільш ясним свідченням щирого бажання українського народу навести лад у хаті”. Українці принаймні знають до чого вони прагнуть. Але не варто забувати і про те, що травневі вибори вже не за горами і хтось має виконувати роль капітана корабля, незважаючи на власну недосконалість. Україна сьогодні – це чистий аркуш паперу і тепер вона не повинна прагнути побудувати чиюсь утопію. На сьогоднішній день, активність та компроміс являються основними ключами від виживання країни та її майбутнього добробуту.

Одне з основних завдань на сьогодні полягає у формуванні культури конституціоналізму. Теперішня влада зазнала легітимної кризи.  Капітуляція попередніх влад та їх голосування в переважній кількості щодо прийняття нових законів призвело до неочікуваного зворотного ефекту феномена "тушек" 2010 року. Відносини між депутатами та їх виборчими мандатами є нестабільні, беручи до уваги, що парламентські вибори 2012 року були проведені із недотриманням мінімальних демократичних стандартів. Якщо б міжнародна неурядова організація Freedom House дала Україні оцінку ступеня демократичних свобод, на сьогоднішній день, країна не оцінювалася би як вільна. Очевидно, що всі ці майбутні зміни залежать від виборів в травні цього року.

І найпершим завданням має бути розуміння того, що політика більше не може бути пов’язана із позицією особистості у ній. Пострадянський рефлекс наслідування сильного духом лідера має катастрофічний вплив на всі регіони країни. Прийшов час кинути виклик Євразійському міфу, який наголошує на те, що ми всі різні. Цей міф вже коштував багатьом людям у Євразії їх життя і свобод.

Україна повинна прийняти абсолютну парламентську систему правління, якою користується більшість країн Європи. Президент повинен бути залишений тільки із правом на вето та з правом на призначення нових виборів. Сильний прем'єр-міністр може перейняти "президентський стиль" ведення політики, як наприклад, Маргарет Тетчер або Тоні Блер, але зверніть увагу на передачу влади від  Тетчер у 1990 році. Знана у світі як "залізна леді", в той час коли вона втратила підтримку своєї партії, її політична  сила зникла за лічені години. Існує і об’єктивне підтвердження тому, що парламентські системи, які при необхідності враховують більш широкий спектр зацікавлених сторін, мають кращі показники досягнення реформ.

Система функціонування партій також потребує реформи. Україна повинна викрити “віртуальні партії”, які функціонують виключно навколо особистостей і їх бізнес-інтересів і носять певний  ідеологічний характер. Значний відсоток виборчих голосів  на останніх виборах отримали  ліві радикали («Комуністична партія України»)  радикали-націоналісти  («Свобода») ,що нажаль підтверджує факт, що принаймні чверть українських виборців вирішили голосувати віддаючи перевагу ідеологічними переконаннями. Ми повинні дати виборцям із помірно центристських  та правоцентристських  політичних партій право на голос також. Маємо працювати і з тими представниками політичних угрупувань, переконання яких, можливо, не повністю узгоджується із нашими переконаннями, адже партія представляє собою коаліцію з різнобічними інтересами.

Мати парламентську систему правління також означає підпорядкування правилам цієї системи. Після травневих виборів 2014 не має проявитися жодної толерантності щодо  «гри на фортепіано на Майдані», насильств в тюрмах, блокування трибуни спікера, або будь-яких інших подібних заходів. Можливо, Верховна Рада має відігравати роль рефері  по відношенню до  депутат атів, що порушили протокол. В іншому випадку, спокуса зрізати кути буде дуже сильною, і ми досить ясно бачимо цей результат зараз.

Для того щоб зберегти єдність України, ми маємо замислитися над тим як задіяти усіх і кожного у політичному процесі. Ось де виникає дилема. Сьогодні є вкрай необхідно створити нові основні політичні норми на Україні і це безпосередньо стосується прийняття нової Конституції України. Міністр закордонних справ Росії закликає до прийняття нової Конституції лише після виборів, яка має бути ухвалена на референдумі. Ця думка представляє собою логічне втілення, але є проблема. Якщо ми споглянемо на те, яким чином Янукович вніс дестабілізацію в конституційні структури України в 2010 році, вагомий аргумент підпадає на підтримку нових законів у першу чергу, але беззаперечно для легітимності таких дій, вся країна має бути задіяна.

І олігархи відіграють тут свою роль . Вони можуть продовжувати грати активну і впливову роль, так само, як,наприклад, республіканці роблять в Америці. Тим не менш, беручи до уваги цілеспрямованість країни вони повинні визнати, що їх найвпливовіший час вже проминув. Це означає, що ЄС має змогу зіграти ключову роль. Михайло Саакашвілі нещодавно говорив про те, як непередбачувана загроза санкцій стала переломним моментом для багатьох прихильників Януковича. І якщо загроза санкцій від ЕС стосувалася економічних та політичних зловживань в більш поширених випадках до яких часто прибігають олігархи, то в такий спосіб було б можливим зменшити надмірні повноваження бізнес еліт України . Значно ускладнює цю ситуацію роль олігархів, які попри всі негаразди та невдачі попередньої влади  не зупинили її підтримку, навіть у той час коли ситуація різко погіршилася. Важко оцінити виняткову впливовість олігархів в політичному житті країни, в подальшому може виявитися і те, що їх впливовість стане неминучою.

Для того, щоб зауважити на всі відмінності регіонів України необхідно багато часу. На сьогодні Україні не вистачає політичної зрілості для федералізму, що може спровокувати зовнішнє втручання у вразливі для країни регіони, як ситуація в Криму нам про це і засвідчила. Проте в питаннях, що стосуються мовних прав, таке втручання може нести логічний характер, що  дозволить  деяку свободу на місцевому рівні. Наприклад у Франції, мови меншин можна побачити на дорожніх знаках,вони фінансуються за допомогою місцевих муніципалітетів, але національна мова має також бути відображена на дорожніх знаках (і місцевий муніципалітет платить і за це). Це насправді може стати чудовою рисою розвитку місцевої демократії. Відповідальність за святкування історичних подій, будь то 9 травня, або ж день українського повстанського руху, повинні також здійснюватися на місцевому рівні, адже на національному рівні ці питання виявилися занадто розбіжними. Такі емоційні питання більше не повинні бути пропагандистськими запалами або інструменти для політиків впливу в країні.

Деякі з найвагоміших питань все ще залишаються без відповідей. Найбільш важливою є загроза, що стосується робочих місць у Східній Україні, яка відтепер становить торгову блокаду Путіна. Яким чином ми можемо пояснити людям, що це не привід, щоб підтримувати вступ України до Митного союзу, або ж протистояння проти демократії? Швидше, факт того, що Путін використовує їх робочі місця як політичний інструмент, має стати чинником загального обурення, і населення Східної України має бути більш невдоволеним щодо цього, ніж будь-хто. Передбачуване зростання цін на газ також викликає занепокоєння, хоча заздалегідь передбачуваний план щодо зворотного потоку газу зі Словаччини майже не має перешкод.

У відносинах з Росією довіра буде зменшуватися з кожним роком і Україна має захистити себе. В найближчому часі всі переговори на вищому рівні між Україною і Росією мають здійснюватися на терені третьої країни-посередника,а також  дотримуватися дипломатичних норм. Ми не маємо допустити перенесення дипломатичних відносин у площину таємних зустрічей та залякувань, як це можна прослідити на прикладі відносин між Януковичем та Путіним. Необхідно докласти багато зусиль для того,щоб відносини між Україною та Росією стали прозорими.

Ступінь саботажу зі сторони Росії щодо управління внутрішніми справами України протягом останніх кількох років очевидне. Більше дискусій мають проводитися серед публічного загалу, а також  піддаватися детальній критиці.

Україна повинна продовжувати наполегливо працювати, що також підтверджує і те, що насправді, багато з українських установ вже і роблять. У сфері оборони, що рідко згадується, навіть за часи президентства Януковича, країна концентрувала свої сили на співпраці з НАТО в багатьох областях. На сьогоднішній день імовірність переходу до професійної армії є великою. Політика Європейської інтеграції після трьох місяців перерви може бути поновлена і за наявності політичної волі ‘з верхівок’ технічна частина операції має досягти найкращих результатів.

Зважаючи на всі події в новій історії України,  українці тепер розуміють, що майбутнє залежить від них. ЄС має бути прийнято в якості гаранта європейського майбутнього України, але українці не може повністю покладатися на це об’єднання держав. Слідуючи логіці коментарів Саакашвілі, якби ЄС діяли раніше в умовах кризи, 100 українців залишилося б в живих сьогодні.

Джонатан Хiбберд раніше був відвідуючим професором програми європейських досліджень в Києво-Могилянській академії і проживав в Україні протягом шести років. Зараз живе у Варшаві, але продовжує співпрацювати з науково-дослідницьким інститутом зовнішньої політики Дипломатичної академії України. Отримав ступінь Магістра  Університета Сассекса у Великобританії.  Спеціалізується на українських відносин з ЄС і НАТО.

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Parliamentary or bust


Ukraine’s new political system must be a radical departure from anything seen in the post-Soviet space

It’s not new for Ukrainians to want change. Just 9 years ago, it seemed the country was embarking on a change of direction and hopes were high. This time there is caution, and remembrance that the cost this time was far higher. The frosty reception Tymoshenko has received following her release is the clearest indication of a wholehearted desire to ‘clean house’. Ukrainians at least know what they don’t want. But May’s elections will come soon and somebody needs to be steering the ship, however imperfect. Ukraine has before it a fresh sheet of paper, but it cannot aspire to build anyone’s utopia. Inclusivity and compromise are now the keys to the country’s survival and future prosperity.

One massive challenge is to engender a culture of constitutionalism. The current authorities face a legitimacy crisis. The capitulation of the previous authorities and their voting in significant numbers for new laws has created a disconcerting reverse of the ‘tushki’ phenomenon of 2010. The relationship between deputies and their electoral mandates is now tenuous, not forgetting that the parliamentary elections of 2012 were held to poor democratic standards. If Freedom House were to assess the country today, it would not be classed as free. It obviously all depends now on the coming May elections.

The first lesson that has to be learned is that politics can’t be any more about the personalities. The post-Soviet reflex of looking to a ‘strong leader’ has had disastrous results across the region for all to see. It’s time to challenge the Eurasian myth that ‘we are different’. This myth has already cost too many people in Eurasia their lives and freedoms.

Ukraine has to adopt a wholly parliamentary system of government of the type found across most of Europe. The President should be left only with the power of veto and to call new elections. A strong Prime Minister can adopt a ‘presidential style’, like Margaret Thatcher or Tony Blair, but note Thatcher’s political demise in 1990. She was the ‘iron lady’, but when she lost the support of her party the power drained out of her overnight. It has been objectively shown that parliamentary systems, which have to by necessity take account of a wider range of stakeholders, have a better record of achieving reforms.

The party system needs reform too. Ukraine must ditch the ‘virtual parties’ which revolve solely around personalities and business interests, and embrace ideology. The high percentage of votes at the last election for the far left (Communists) and far right (Svoboda), although perhaps regrettable, told us that at least a quarter of Ukrainian voters chose to vote along ideological lines. We need to give the more moderate centre left and centre right populations that voice too. We will have to work with those who we may not totally agree with, but a party is a coalition of interests.

To have a parliamentary system also means adherence to parliamentary rules. Post-May 2014 there should be zero tolerance of ‘piano playing’, violence in the chamber, blocking the rostrum, or any such activities. Perhaps the Verkhovna Rada needs to be ‘refereed’, with deputies suspended for some time for breaches of protocol. Otherwise, the temptation to cut corners will be very acute, and we see clearly now the result.

To preserve the unity of Ukraine, we must think about how to bring all into the political process. There is a dilemma here. There is an imperative to establish new ground rules for politics in Ukraine, and that means a new constitution. Russia’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs is calling for the new constitution to be established only after elections, and for it to be subject to a referendum. That might sound reasonable enough, but there is a problem. If we look at how Yanukovych was able to take a wrecking ball to Ukraine’s constitutional structure in 2010, there is a strong argument for having the new rules in place first, but of course to have legitimacy, the whole country must be involved.

The oligarchs have a role to play here. They can continue to play a strong and influential role, just as wealthy backers of, for example, the Republicans do in America. However, in terms of the country’s assets they have to accept that their cup run is over. The EU could play a pivotal role here. Mikhael Saakashvili spoke recently about how the concrete threat of sanctions was a tipping point for many of Yanukovych’s supporters to pull the plug. If that threat hung over economic and political abuses more generally, this would limit the business elite to a role which was powerful but not excessive. What complicates this is the role of those oligarchs who failed to withdraw backing from the previous regime even as the situation deteriorated. It is more difficult to make a moral case for their continued involvement in the country’s politics, although we may find that it’s unavoidable.

How to accommodate the country’s regional differences needs much thought. At this time Ukraine lacks the political maturity for federalism, which would also leave parts of the country too vulnerable to outside interference. However, in issues such as language rights, it may make sense to allow some discretion at local level. In France, for example, minority languages can appear on street signs at the behest of local municipalities as long as the national language is also displayed (and the local municipality pays for it). This might actually be a good exercise in local democracy. Responsibility for celebrations of historical events, whether it be 9 May or the Ukrainian insurgency, should also be managed at local level, as nationally these issues have proved too divisive. Such emotive issues should not be propagandist fodder or tools for the country’s politicians any longer.

Some of the biggest issues still remain unanswered. Most significant is the threat to jobs in Eastern Ukraine from Putin’s now inevitable trade blockade. How do we explain to these people that this is not a reason to support Ukraine’s accession to the Customs Union, or to oppose democracy? Rather, it is an outrage that Putin is so content to exploit their jobs as a political tool, and they should be more angry about this than anyone. The impending gas price hikes are also a concern, although contingency plans such as reverse flow from Slovakia ought to now face fewer obstacles.

In dealings with Russia trust will be at an all time low, and Ukraine needs to protect itself. For the foreseeable future all high level talks between Ukraine and Russia should be hosted by a third country and adhere to diplomatic norms. We must not allow the degeneration into secret meetings and bullying that Putin-Yanukovych relations became. Plenty of work is needed into how to make Russia-Ukraine relations more transparent. The extent of Russian sabotage in Ukraine’s internal governance over the past several years is plain to see. More discussions need to be on the record and subjected to the greatest scrutiny.

Ukraine also needs to continue much of the patient hard work that in fact many of its institutions have already been doing. In the sphere of defence, it is rarely mentioned that the country, even under Yanukovych, was forming ever greater co-operation with NATO in many areas, and the previously announced transition to a professional army will probably now come to pass. European integration policy will also be salvageable after its 3 month hiatus, and with political will from the top the technical work will be able to proceed all the better.

Despite this, Ukrainians now realise that the future depends on them. The EU would be greatly welcomed as a guarantor to Ukraine’s European future, but it cannot be wholly relied upon. Following the logic of Saakashvili’s comments, had they acted earlier in the crisis, 100 more Ukrainians might still be alive today.

    

Friday, January 31, 2014

EU-Ukraine: EU should act unilaterally on visas

  • The EU must reach out to citizens unilaterally on visas and travel, rather than engaging with Ukraine's incompetent and feckless officials.
After a distressing few weeks in Ukraine, the river Bug seems now to undoubtedly mark the boundary of free and unfree Europe. Somehow the visa free travel regime for EU and and other western visitors to come to Ukraine has survived up until now, but lawmakers are now looking at how to place restrictions on foreigners entering the country. They advocate a fee for entry (such as countries like Egypt currently operate) but, most scarily, a requirement that the person travelling can demonstrate funds of 400 Euros for each day of their stay, so a 10 day visit to Kiev would necessitate the traveller having a spare 4000 Euros idling away in the bank, clearly prohibitive to many potential visitors. Meanwhile, the EU-Ukraine visa dialogue still mumbles on about Ukraine and other EU eastern neighbours fulfiling 'conditions' and 'requiremements', when it's obvious that this doesn't achieve results.

The proposed restrictions are most likely aimed at disrupting small time activists, quite often ordinary westerners who are drawn to the protest movement and wish to offer moral support, evidenced by the various national flags which have shown up at Kiev's City Hall or on the famous Maidan tree. Many such people would be instantly priced out of coming to Ukraine. It would also be a kind of populist measure. Many Ukrainians would feel little sympathy for roeigners having to jump through hoops as they routinely have to do, but the reality of course is just people choosing not to come. It's already hardly a mecca for tourism, or on many people's bucket list. For Poles it could be quite traumatic, as even school study trips to 'Lwów' would be effectively thwarted. For Hungarians, links with relatives in Zakarpattia would suffer. The potential effect on families if implemented (and enforced of course) could be devastating. 

What's clear is that Ukraine's authrities have no interest whatsoever in their citizens, and in small (non-oligarchic) businesses. Casualties would be potential visitors to Lviv, touted in recent times as the next big tourism destination. It would deal a significant blow to other types of tourism too. The marriage agencies of Odesa or Yalta would be hit hard. It's also the authorities 'being clever' by trying not to untick any boxes in efforts for Ukrainians to gain visa free travel, but clealy it's not clever at all. It would do nothing to enhance trust and dialogue with the EU, already at rock bottom.  

The EU needs to fundamentally rethink the rules of doing business in this area. In my view, the problem is not necessarily visas, but the short duration of visas, the requirement to have different types of visa for different types of trips and the humiliating nature of gaining such visas. I would propose 5 year all-purpose, multi-entry visas, possibly biometric ones, a kind of 'Euro Visa' which could then be used in EU/EEA passport queues. This would effectively give most of the benefits of visa free travel, but would give states the option of withdrawing the privilege to those who overstay or work illegally. It is also something that the EU could do unilaterally, without waiting for some distant age where the Ukrainian authorities have suddenly become competent and started caring about their citizens. The same should be extended to all the EU's eastern neighbours, including Russia and Belarus, without consultation with their authorities. 

Travel is the single most powerful tool the EU has to change hearts and minds. The popularity of travel for Russian citizens form Kaliningrad to Poland, for example, will help in the long term to underme the societal myths of Eurasianism there. This is an important part of the EU staying relevant and exporting its values, at a time when it is more urgently needed than ever.

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Europe's Tiananmen Must be Stopped

Some thoughts on the Ukraine crisis that I'm not hearing addressed elsewhere.


This is serious

  • The clearing of Maidan would be Europe's Tiananmen Square. Europe will bear responsibility for not preventing it.
The fall of Kiev's Lenin monument, just like the fall of Budapest's Stalin statue in 1956, may not be the harbinger of victory. The Tiananmen Square protests lasted 7 weeks, with students occupying the square as Kiev's activists do now. The appearance of military vehicles on Kiev's streets evoked memories of the man who famously blocked a tank in the protests. Tens of people died in the resulting crackdown. I don't think Europe realises that they might be about to watch something similar happening on their watch. Yanukovych has already shown he is willing to militarise the city with snipers, live bullets and combat vehicles. It's uncomfortable. We wish it weren't true, but it is. Europe regrets Yugoslavia. That conflict led to a sense of moral responsibility to bring the Western Balkans into the EU accession process, but the same moral responsibility did not extend to post Orange Revolution Ukraine. That now looks like a colossal mistake. Do we want 20 years on to create more regrets for ourselves?


Sideline the EU

  • Calling on the EU to help has exhausted itself. The focus needs to switch to governments of European countries instead.
Successive European treaties and treaty negotiations have long advocated greater powers, with Europe still haunted by its lack of capacity to act in Yugoslavia. Politicians spoke of European armies. These efforts finally culminated in the post of Foreign Policy Representative being created, the 'single telephone number' (in Ashton's case only until 8pm of course). The Ukraine crisis in fact shows that the EU had no business asking for greater competence in foreign policy at Lisbon. Although foreign policy competence of technically speaking ‘remains with member states’, even the pretention of EU foreign policy seems to be a pointless folly. In actual fact, it means people ‘calling on the EU’, which suits the interests of disinterested, toothless, or Russia-friendly governments, providing them with a screen for member states to hide behind. I'm beginning to think the EU should abandon its grand ambitions and revert to a looser trade pact (or be replaced by something else). Greater intergration seems to actually render it impotent altogether. And its not the fault of enlargement-some of the most vocal countries on the crisis are the newer members (e.g. Poland). It is only with a push from a Merkel, Hollande, or a Cameron that we might see the EU initiate sanctions, so it’s them that we should be holding to account for doing or not doing so.


Russian involvement
  • Claims of Russian Federation personnel on Kiev’s streets, if true, urgently need to be substantiated.

We seem to know very little indeed of Russia’s direct involvement in the events in Kiev. Publicly they ‘watch with concern’, and simultaneously speak to world media about the crisis whilst their own tv channels variously downplay or grossly twist the truth of what’s happening in Kiev. Knowing from the debacle in November that set this whole thing in motion that Russia-Ukraine relations are totally untransparent, and that Yanukovych is inevitably getting desperate, it’s inconceivable that Russia is not involved in it somewhere. It might be intelligence support, assistance with cyber attacks. Who knows? I am only speculating. Most worrying are suggestions that some of the ‘Berkut’ (‘special assignment’ police forces) on the streets of Kiev are in fact Russian Berkut in Ukraine uniforms. One estimate on twiiter claimed that 8000 had been counted, but that Ukraine’s total number of Berkut amounts to only around 4000. Much earlier on, observers pointed out that Russian-speaking Berkut struggled to communicate with Ukrainian-speaking activists, difficult to account for as even Russian speakers in Ukraine are exposed to Ukrainian on a daily basis. It's entirely fair to say that it's unlikely to be true. However, such reports, if true, need to be substantiated urgently, as it would have massive implications. If Euromaidan was to be cleared by 4000 in fact Russian Berkut, it’s tantamount to sending tanks into Kiev by stealth.
 
The Sochi Factor

  • Sochi 2014 gives Ukraine another 2 weeks’ grace
A window of opportunity exists now to solve the Ukraine crisis without direct Russian involvement, as Russia will never embark on a ‘Georgia 2008’ whilst its pet prestige project Sochi 2014, and associated global charm offensive, is taking place. It should be clear that Russia’s prisoner releases were, as Pussy Riot wasted no time in telling us, a publicity stunt. Many less high profile prisoners in Russia have been less fortunate, and perhaps the Russian authorities couldn’t quite hang on in letting on that Khodorkovsky will still need to be neutralized as a force, most likely unable to return. Once Sochi finishes, the gloves will be off once more. The last thing we want is Russian ‘peacekeepers’ in Ukraine. Time is short.

 

Monday, January 06, 2014

The Scots, the Catalans, the Ukrainians and the Normans

Russian thinking on Ukraine, and itself, is swimming against the tide

You're in a city where the signs are in one language, although many of the inhabitants speak another, the dominant but related language of a major power. One could be thinking of Catalan in Barcelona, or in fact Ukrainian in Kiev. I once really upset a lady from Western Ukraine by making this comparison. To her, Catalonia is only a region of a country, whereas Ukraine most certainly isn't, so the parallel seemed to her belittling. Some Catalans might well see the connection straight away however, as something approaching a majority there now talk of independence from their dominant 'neighbour'.

Such analogies are never perfect, but that hasn't stopped Russia making them publicly in its pursuit of Ukraine. The Russian Ambassador to France sat them down and patiently explained that Ukraine to Russia is like Normandy is to France-essentially inseparable. This analogy is facile though (and even if accepted, it doesn't begin to explain Russia's similar attitude to Georgia, Armenia or Moldova). I would suggest two more suitable ones, and in fact 2014 looks like being an important year for those nations in the shadow of their bigger relative, and the comparisons show just how far off the pace the Russian view is.

For the record, I personally feel more English than British (St. George's should be a public holiday and Anglo-Saxon history taught in schools), but I also feel European (EU freedom of movement is a good thing all round, including Poles, Romanians and Bulgarians), so I don't know whose agenda I'm serving here as neither UKIP nor the liberals would want me I expect. I'm also suspicious of countries that were artificial constructs-they never seem to last. Take Yugoslavia, Czechoslvakia or the USSR. Maybe even the UK? Unlike many academics, I don't consider the nations of Western and Eastern Europe to be intrinsically different. I'm sure, as I'm not from Russia I don't know much, but correct me if any of the dates are wrong. 

Scotland & Britain

The Act of Union between England and Scotland in 1707 took place just two years before Mazepa's last stand against the Russians at Poltava in 1709, so the England-Scotland and Russia-Ukraine unions have both basically existed for 300 years. As the Russians talk about 'Little Russia', the British establishment (which included Scots too by the way) promoted the idea that England would now be 'South Britain', Scotland 'North Britain' and (perhaps most optimistically) Ireland 'West Britain', although needless to say it didn't stick.

Scotland can claim two native languages. One, Gaelic, is enjoying a notable revival, now as visible on 'Welcome to Scotland' signs as "Croeso i Cymru' is in Wales. The other however, Scots, a close relative to English, is perhaps more pertinent to our loose analogy. Like Ukrainian, it has often been dismissed as a dialect of its dominant neighbour, but linguistic experts consider it a language; It has vocabulary which, in some instances, is more recognisible to, say, Norwegians than English (it also, like Ukrainian, once spread deeper into its neighbour's territory). Scots is somehow less prominent though. Like, say, Swiss German, it is rarely visible in its written form.

It used to be said that only around 25% of Scots favoured full independence, and discussion tended to revolve around North Sea oil revenues. Then came devolution, including tax raising powers, and then a Scottish National Party minority government, culminating in next September's 2014 referendum on independence. Support for breaking away is now put at a third of the population and there is a big difference between being asked a theoretical question and a real question.

Of course there is a strategy, official or otherwise, in London to try to keep the Scottish on board. Slightly echoing the situation with Ukraine, pessimism is the tool of choice here too, that Scotland variously 'wouldn't survive' and 'needs Britain'. One of the failures so far of the 'yes' campaign is to move the debate out of these narrow economic arguments which are basically about short term considerations and often based on assumptions. The debate should surely be about how Scottish people view themselves and their future, and the emotive aspect, that of cultural identity and what Scottish people feel that they are is at least as important as hospital prescriptions.

Nonetheless, you can't fault London in the sense that the issue will be decided by a referendum to the people in Scotland. Once upon a time there was a referendum on Ukrainian independence from the USSR, in fact in 1990, in which each region voted for Ukraine's independence, even the Donbas and Crimea. So if the Scots vote yes in 2014, following Russia's example, a bit of arm twisting in 20 years' time should put to rights any aberration in the Scottish vote. 

Catalonia & Spain

Iberia was overrun by the Moors while Kievan Rus was ransacked by Mongol hordes (the Arab cultural influence on Castillians is as true as the Asian influence on the Russians, but, unlike the Russian 'Eurasians', the Spanish are Europeans, and don't claim to be 'Eurafricans', 'Eurarabs' or any such nonsense). One country to emerge from the reconquista was Catalonia. Its incorporation into Spain (and France) again takes place during the 17th-18th centuries with the Treaty of the Pyrenees in 1659 coming just five years after Bohdan Khmelnytsky gave the Russians the car keys at Pereyeslav in 1654 (rather like Yanukovych has just done). Portugal could conceivably have ended up in exacty the same position (one school of thought is that Catalonia moved first, allowing Portugal to break free).

The comparison to be made between Catalan/Spanish and Ukrainian/Russian seems to me a striking one. Both languages punch below their weight; Ukrainian is Europe's 8th most spoken language while Catalan has more speakers than many of the EU's member states. The Russification of Ukraine in the Russian Empire/USSR and imposition of Castillian by Franco, changing Catalan names and place names to Spanish ones, is a familiar story for Ukrainians and Catalans alike. That strange feeling of seeing one language written on the city's street signs but hearing another more commonly spoken on the streets is common both to Kiev and Barcelona. The temptation to mix with a language that is closely related is also acute; in Ukraine that is the 'surzhik' of Russian and Ukrainian and in Catalonia the tendency to come out with Spanish words in a Catalan way rather than pure Catalan (Ukrainians might think of Prime Minister Azarov here).

In terms of an aim of independence, Catalonia on one level seems to have the furthest to go here. Madrid simply says a referendum on independence is 'illegal' but how long does an argument of that sort sit with the basics of democratic legitimacy? It's interesting to observe Catalonia's politicians appealing to the EU on this issue. As with Ukraine, the EU may not have the will or tools to assist meaningfully there either. Spain fears losing a prosperous province and the re-emergence of the Basque problem, but if Scotland and Catalonia show something that Northern Ireland and the Basque Country don't, it's that democratic means can slowly but surely nudge you closer towards your aims.

Catalans, whatever the situation, are, unlike Ukrainians and Russians, completely free to protest and express their views. Catalonia also continues to enjoy real autonomy. Had such autonomy been given to Ukraine in a hypothetical democratising 1980s USSR, perhaps Russia and Ukraine would have stayed together after all, but it's too late, Russia too autocratic, to hope to achieve this kind of outcome now. 2014 won't yield a referendum there but the zeitgeist may mean Catalonia moving closer in that direction, and it's difficult to ignore the zeitgeist.

France & Normandy?

Just to be charitable, I will entertain the Russian Ambassador's analogy a little longer. Normandy was incorporated into France in 1204 (about half a century after the founding of Moscow). The country of France itself had come into being barely 300 years earlier.

Linguistically, Normandy speaks French, and spoke French even as an independent kingdom. Norman French was even the language of royalty and administration in England for hundreds of years follwing the Norman Conquest. So where is the 19th century Norman equivalent of Taras Shevchenko writing his poems in the Norman language? Where is the national awakening? Most crucially, where is the independence movement? Need I go on?

For a better analogy however, France offers several. Look at Corsica, incorporated in 1768, and still restive. The supposedly irrefutable Russian claim to Crimea goes back to its annexation by Russia around the same time, in 1783. Western Savoy was first conquered by Napoleon in 1792, and finally cemented as a part of France in 1860. A Russian contemporary of Nice might be Sochi, founded by Russian imperial expansion in 1838 (but, unlike Nice, consolidated by the ethnic cleansing of the local Circassian population in the mid 19th century).

France in fact has 8 histrical linguistic minorities (Alsatian, Flemish, Breton, Walloon, Corsican, Catalan, Basque and Occitan) as well as numerous dialects and patois. A really interesting case would be the southern third of France, the Occitan territory. This historically spoke the 'langue d'Oc', a language more akin to Catalan. Had history developed differently, who knows if that would have become France's Ukraine?

The Russian Ambassador might have been on safer ground talking about Kievan Rus and the continuity of 'Rasiya' from 'Rus', but then you'd have to ask why France doesn't claim Franconia in Southern Germany? Best keep it simple I suppose. Imagine France bullying Belgium into accepting a role as its vassal state, installing a Francophone government with scant regard for the rights of Dutch speakers, maybe even a Flemish-hating education minister and you're somewhere closer to the mark. After all, the coal mines and steel mills of the industrial south are where the wealth is, and that's the future, surely? Sounds like the 19th century though, right?